C.L. WELLS

Posts Tagged: life

Today we’re saying hello to the weekend with a lovely interview from a children’s author. Marcia is the author of the children’s picture book, The Pillow Fairy. Look at this cover! It’s absolutely adorable. Welcome, Marcia! Thank you for being here. Tell me about The Pillow Fairy. What is about and what inspired the story? M: It is the true story of our sons, Justin and Matt, and what we did to get them to sleep in their own beds when they were little. I wrote the book over 20 years ago, and with the encouragement of family and friends, self-published it on August of 2012. The beautiful illustrations of Joni E. Patterson have enabled The Pillow Fairy to become a family favorite. It has helped thousands of little ones sleep in their own beds, and is asked to be read over and over again. Wow! First of all, congratulations! Second, I’m glad your … click here to read the full article.

Welcome back to another installment in the ‘A Kansas Author’ blog series. Today, my interview is with an author of children’s books! Let me tell you, Mary Ann Wittman’s books are adorned with the sweetest covers. Clemmie and the Mailman is my favorite, so far! Welcome, Mary Ann! Where in Kansas did you grow up? M: In Salina. Have you lived in Kansas your whole life? M: No, I have lived also in Mississippi, Texas, Colorado, and overseas in Izmir, Turkey. Wow, Turkey! When did you know you wanted to write? M: I have always had a creative imagination and have written poems and short essays. As I began to develop stories in my mind, I decided to begin writing them down. What is the name of the first book you published? M: The first book is titled ‘The Little Christmas Tree.’ What’s it about? M: It is about a small, sad little tree that … click here to read the full article.

Hi, everyone! I hope you’re all enjoying this blog series as much as I am. When I put the request out there for the interviews, I had no idea how fascinating these folks would be. Initially, I just wanted to shed some light on local talent. Being a new author, I know how difficult it is to break into the market. You can work your tail off and barely scratch the surface. It’s a never-ending challenge. You have to toot your own horn so much that your cheeks end up with a permanent blush from the countless times you’ve embarrassed yourself. So, I figured I could toot a few horns for others and have been blessed in the process. *********************** Today, I welcome Ronda Miller, author of MoonStain, a collection of poetry. Ronda! Welcome and thank you for being willing. R: Thank you!  So you grew up in Kansas, is that right? R: I … click here to read the full article.

Howdy, Peeps! Welcome to the third interview in this blog series. Thank you all so much for following and getting to know these authors through their interviews. Today, our special guest is Kyle Ferlemann. I have to tell you all that Kyle fascinated me. I’m somewhat of a conspiracy theorist so when Kyle told me he a Freemason, I got a little itchy. Then our conversation went down several different roads… mostly because I’m nosey. I can’t even post the entire interview because it would make the blog too long. Now here I am taking up more space explaining all this. ****************************** Welcome, Kyle. Thanks for your willingness to be interviewed. K: Thanks for the invitation to connect. Tell me about your Kansas ties. Did you grow up here? K: I was raised in the Flint Hills of Kansas and forests of Missouri. I traveled a lot as a child but the years I … click here to read the full article.

Welcome back for the next installment of A Kansas Author blog series. I must say, my line-up of special guest interviews is quite impressive! Please help me to welcome long time writer and new author, Charles Kayser! Welcome, Charles! C: Thank you! Let’s jump right in. Obviously, since you’re part of this blog series you have ties in Kansas. Did you grow up in the Sunflower State? C: Yes! I grew up in Americus, Kansas, and except for my two initial teaching years in Denver, I’ve been all Kansas. Wow. You’re a teacher. What subject do you teach? C: I primarily taught English and coached football. I taught for 20 years.  What grades did you teach? C: My first four years was junior high, the rest was high school and also includes four years as an adjunct instructor with Allen County Community College. That’s wonderful! At what point did you know you wanted … click here to read the full article.

Recently, I was invited to attend an Author’s Fair at the public library in my hometown. I met some pretty amazing people and had the privilege of rubbing elbows with folks who’ve been on their writing journey for way longer than I have. Afterward, I was inspired to do a blog series to highlight some of these individuals and their work. I would like to thank Miranda, from the Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library, for reaching out to these authors and begging on my behalf for their time and attention. Please help me to welcome Robert Collins. He is my first guest. Robert! Thanks for being willing to speak with me. R: You’re welcome. Thanks for having me. Tell me a little bit about yourself. Where did you grow up? Have you lived in Kansas your whole life? R: I grew up around the Wichita area, and I’ve lived in the state my whole life. … click here to read the full article.

Welcome, everyone! Today, I have a special guest. This interview is out of the ordinary for me, but I hope to have more like it. I’m excited to share my interview with Cardiff Gerhardt with you. He’s an up and coming actor and musician from Salt Lake City, Utah. If you’ve seen the movie MistleTones over the holidays, you may know him as Ludacris Kringle who takes the stage during a competition scene and raps ‘Away in the Manger.’ Welcome, Cardiff! Thanks so much for accepting my invitation to an interview. C: My pleasure! So, I read your IMDb biography and saw that MistleTones was your first acting job. However, you weren’t really acting, you were rapping! You did a rendition of Away In A Manger that I absolutely fell in love with. I tried to find the song to purchase and when I couldn’t, found you instead. Was that an … click here to read the full article.

Hey, all! Happy New Year! We made it to 2016 and we owe it to ourselves to do the best we can with it. I love starting this year with the eleventh entry of the Self-Harm Blog Series. I’m honored to be a part of helping those who’ve struggled with this problem tell their story. With hopes of helping others who can relate to the pain of self-harm addiction, let us do our part in spreading the ‘word.’ The word is hope. The word is healing. The word is possibilities. The word is Love. God’s love. Your love. My love. Let us begin. Today is my interview with Kirsty. She is a young woman I met on Twitter who has been free of self-harm for a year! Woo-hoo! Welcome, Kirsty, and congratulations on your success! K: Thank you. When did you first self-harm? K: Honestly, I can’t put my finger … click here to read the full article.

A Guest Post by Connie Stephany   Normal (Adjective): usual or standard What does that word really mean? I think everyone’s definition is likely quite different. For me, normal was growing up having my shoulder come out of socket in a swim meet and then being able to only swim with one arm. I was sick constantly, missing school and picking up every single illness possible. Later in my life, normal meant taking longer than “usual” to recover from c-sections and having no explanation why. It was having constant body aches and headaches. It was having me cry or scream when someone touched me the wrong way. How do you explain to your 3-year-old that it hurts to have them sit on your lap? I suffered in silence. I thought everyone dealt with those things. Right? Wrong. It wasn’t until a couple years ago when I found out that what was happening to me was anything but normal. … click here to read the full article.

A Guest Post by Robin Helm Never say never. Nearly eight years ago, after seventeen years at that particular Christian school, I lost my teaching job. I had been teaching for twenty-seven years. It was as if I had lost my identity – comparable to dealing with the death of a loved one. I mourned for two years. I promised myself I’d never teach in school again. However, I couldn’t just crawl into a hole and shut myself away. We needed my income, so I had to find a job. During my college years as a music major, I taught piano lessons and played for voice lessons to make extra money. I was young and impatient, so teaching piano wasn’t much fun. I told myself that I wasn’t cut out to be a piano teacher. The first full-time job I had after I finished college was as a bank teller. … click here to read the full article.

Scroll To Top